20 things Not To Do Before Bed part 2

This is the continued part of a post i posted earlier this week. you can check it out here

Featured: 20 Things You Shouldn't Do Before Bed

Smoke
We could go on and on about all the ways smoking is terrible for you, including disturbing your sleep. Many people smoke to relax, says Grandner, but nicotine is a stimulant and can make insomnia worse, especially if you light up close to your bedtime. Nicotine withdrawal can also cause smokers to wake up earlier than they normally would in the morning.

"If you’re a smoker and you’re having trouble sleeping, that may be another reason you should talk to your doctor about quitting," Grandner says. It’s not just traditional cigarettes you should avoid at night; e-cigarettes, smoking cessation patches, pipes, cigars, and chewing tobacco can all keep you up.

Chug lots of water
"Staying hydrated is important, but it may not be the best strategy to drink a huge glass of water before bed or sleep with one water by your bed," says Grandner, "unless your goal is to get up in the middle of the night to use the bathroom. Instead, he suggests, make sure you’re drinking plenty of water throughout the day—and always be sure to use the bathroom before you head to bed, even if you don’t feel like you have to.


Work out too intensely
You may have heard that exercise before bed might keep you awake at night. This belief has been largely disproven, says Grandner: “The amount of physical activity that’s required to have an affect on your sleep is pretty intense, and the vast majority of people don’t get enough exercise as it is—we don’t want people to not work out just because they think it’s too late.” In fact, getting regular exercise has been shown to actually help treat insomnia and promote good sleeping habits.

There is some evidence, though, that prolonged or very high-intensity exercise late at night may make it hard for some people to fall asleep. If you’re staying up extra late to squeeze in time at the gym, or suspect that your 9 p.m. kickboxing classes may be keeping you up, see if you sleep better after an earlier workout.

Play video games
The science on television’s effects on sleep is somewhat inconclusive; some studies show that watching TV before bed can disrupt sleep (due to its melatonin-impairing blue light, its mental stimulation, or both), while others show it has little effect. One thing that most experts do agree on, however, is that electronic media that requires a lot of interaction—like video games—can definitely wreak havoc on your slumber.

"Browsing the web or flipping through TV channels before bed may not be so bad if you’re not super sensitive to light," says Grandner, "but anything that’s highly engaging will almost certainly keep you awake." Dr. Rosenberg agrees: "Stimulation from these devices can activate and excite the brain, which presents a challenge when it comes to trying to fall asleep."


Turn up the heat
Everyone’s preferences are different, but most tend to sleep best between 60 and 70 degrees. “People sleep better when it’s cooler—sometimes a little cooler than they think,” says Grandner. That’s because the body’s temperature drops during the night, and also because a lower temperature allows for people to cover up with blankets without getting too hot.

Of course, if it’s freezing in your house and you can’t fall asleep without shivering, there’s nothing wrong with bumping the heat up a degree. But know that you’ll probably sleep better at a slightly cooler temperature than your house is set at during the day.

Let your pet into bed
"Everyone with a pet knows that inviting that pet into your bed is inviting a whole lost more awakenings during the night," says Grandner. In fact, in a recent University of Kansas study, 63% of people who shared a bed with a furry friend experienced poor sleep. "If you’re cool with that, go right ahead—but it’s definitely something to consider if it starts to affect your sleep quality," Grandner says.

And those sleep disturbances can come from more than just your dog or cat’s movements through the night. Pet hair and dander in your bed could also contribute to allergies and breathing difficulties, which can also affect your slumber.

Take a shower
If you shower after working out at night or you are simply in the habit of bathing before bed, there’s certainly nothing wrong with it; a hot bath may even help relax you and prime your body for sleep. But if you normally rinse off in the morning and you only switch it up occasionally, bathing at night could send the wrong message to your brain.

"Showers often wake people up, so it might not be the best thing to do before bed," says Grandner. People with long hair should be careful not to go to bed with wet hair, either; not only can it be uncomfortable and cause knots and tangles, but it can also make sheets and pillows damp, which could cause mold to grow.

Pick a fight
There’s a good reason couples are told to never go to bed angry. “Stress is a major cause of insomnia,” says Dr. Rosenberg. “If a conversation is stressful, it will elevate cortisol and other stress hormones impending your ability to fall asleep.” Plus, he adds, angry people tend to ruminate, or play over thoughts again and again in their minds, which can also make falling asleep difficult.

Going to bed with unresolved issues may not be your best bet either, but Dr. Rosenberg suggests trying to hash out any problems earlier in the night, and saving important decision-making or serious conversations for days when you have more time to reflect and relax afterward. “A serious conversation before bed is not a good idea,” he adds.


Alter your routine
Doing the same thing every night before bed is one of the tenets of good sleep hygiene. Brushing your teeth, washing your face, and laying out your clothes for the morning, for example, can all send a signal to your brain that it’s time for bed—especially if you do them in the same order, at the same time every night.

But switching up that routine, by doing things out of order or earlier in the night than usual, can disrupt that mental process. “Without a consistent bedtime routine, your brain doesn’t go into sleep mode until you crawl into bed and turn out the light,” says Grandner. “You’ll fall asleep much faster if you can start that process a little bit earlier, as you’re getting ready.”

Anything that’s too exciting
Reading in bed can be a great pre-slumber activity, and if it helps you wind down and makes you tired, says Grandner, then go for it. The same goes for any routine habit that helps you get to sleep—chatting on the phone with your best friend, organizing a photo album, or knitting, for example.

But if that book or that knitting project or whatever else you’re doing draws you in too much, you may have a hard time putting it down and turning out the lights. “When I read at night, I get too absorbed in the story and the next thing I know it’s 3 a.m.,” says Grandner. If this happens to you, be careful about the activities you choose before bed, and set strict time limits for whatever you do decide to take on.

By Amanda MacMillan

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